New York

Address: 

1300 Union Turnpike, Suite 304
New Hyde Park, New York 11040

Work: 
(516) 488-3716
Fax: 
(516) 481-3716
Description: 

Dr. Juliet M. Vogel is a former director of training for the Division of Trauma Psychiatry for the North Shore LIJ Health System in Manhasset, New York. Through the NCTSN category II site there, she was involved in the development of programs for children, families, and first responders affected by 9/11, and in the development of a program for military personnel and their families. Her NCTSN workgroup participation has included co-authoring NCTSN’s Psychological First Aid for Schools Field Guide. Dr. Vogel currently teaches the didactic seminar for the Division of Trauma Psychiatry at NSLIJ. She maintains a private practice and does consulting, with a particular interest in family resilience. She is involved in the NCTSN Family Systems, Military Families, and Terrorism and Disaster collaborative groups.

 

Address: 

750 Columbus Avenue, Suite 5-D
New York, NY 10025

Work: 
(917) 716-6546
Description: 

Carrie Epstein is a faculty member at Yale and Director of Clinical Services and Training at the Childhood Violent Trauma Center at the Yale Child Study Center. She is co-developer of the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI), the evidence-based early intervention/secondary prevention model for children who have recently been exposed to potentially traumatic events. Ms. Epstein is also currently in private practice, and provides training and consultation nationally on trauma-focused mental health treatments for children and families impacted by trauma. She is also the former senior director of the Safe Horizon Center for Child Innovation in New York City.

Robin F. Goodman, PhD, ATR-BC

Address: 

303 Fifth Ave. Suite 806
New York, NY 10016

Work: 
(212) 388-1599
Description: 

Robin Goodman is Executive Director of A Caring Hand, the Billy Esposito Foundation in New York, New York, and consultant to St. John’s University. As consultant to the Allegheny General Hospital Center for Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents, she focuses on childhood traumatic grief-related activities and NCTSN projects. Dr. Goodman has also been a consultant for the Department of Defense Educational Opportunities Directorate and for the NCTSN. Previously, as director of bereavement programs at the NYU Child Study Center, an NCTSN grantee, she co-directed a clinical and research program for bereaved 9/11 families.
 

Address: 

20 Park Avenue
Stillwater, NY 12170

Work: 
(518) 944-3703
Description: 

Joseph Benamati is author of START (Systematic Training to Assist in the Recovery from Trauma) and former center director of the Parsons Child and Family Center's NCTSN project in Albany, New York. Dr. Benamati is currently a faculty member at the Sanctuary Leadership Development Institute in Yonkers, New York. He remains involved with the Network through his membership on the NCTSN Steering Committee (2008–2010), and through his trainings and speaking engagements around the United States.

Safe Horizon, Inc., Center for Child Traumatic Stress

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 
The Center for Child Traumatic Stress (CCTS) will adapt, disseminate, implement, and sustain culturally competent, trauma-focused, evidence-based treatment services for children at multiple points in the posttraumatic trajectory. A range of treatments will be provided at Safe Horizon's diverse child service settings throughout New York City including acute and early interventions, and longer-term treatments for more chronic PTSD. During the four years of this project, CCTS expects to serve approximately 28,200 youth.
City, State: 
Brooklyn, NY
Contact: 
Victoria Dexter
Phone: 
(347) 328-8031

University of Rochester, Mt. Hope Family Center, The Promoting Emotional Adjustment in Children Exposed to Violence (PEACE)

Funding Period: 
[22016 -2021, 2012 - 2016 and 2009 - 2012]
Description: 
The Promoting Emotional Adjustment in Children Experiencing challenges (PEACE) project at Mt. Hope Family Center continues to extend evidence-based, trauma-informed services to children and families exposed to challenging and stressful life experiences, such as family member deployment or reintegration; traumatic stress, grief and loss; or maltreatment or exposure to intimate partner violence, domestic violence, or community violence. Populations served include children in the child welfare system, children in military families, and children in the community struggling with traumatic stress symptoms. Three interventions are offered: (1) Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, (2) Alternatives for Families—A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and (3) Child-Parent Psychotherapy. The project has also allowed for staff to provide training on the effects of trauma on children and families and disseminate best practices in implementation of evidence-based interventions locally and nationally.
City, State: 
Rochester, NY
Contact: 
Sheree Toth

Parsons Child and Family Center, Heroes Project

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 
Parsons Child and Family Center’s Sidney Albert Training and Research Institute (SATRI) has provided training, consultation, and research as a NCTSN Community Practice sSite since 2002, including national and regional leadership in developing and disseminating evidence-supported trauma and resiliency-focused services for children and families with traumatic stress. The HEROES Project, a SAMHSA-funded NCTSN grant, provided integrated trauma-informed training for six programs at Parsons, the Albany County Children’s Mental Health Clinic, and the Albany County Department of Children, Youth and Families from 2009-2012. The Project trained therapists, foster parents, residential counselors, child protective services workers, and educators, and evaluated of the efficacy of Real Life Heroes (RLH), a trauma and resiliency-focused treatment, to help children and families who had experienced multiple and interpersonal traumas such as emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, domestic violence, losses, or community violence. Results of HEROES Project research are being published in a journal of the American Psychological Association and include statistically significant decreases in child behavior problems and trauma symptoms. The study supported the efficacy of implementing trauma and resiliency-focused treatment in a wide range of child welfare and children’s mental health programs. Following Parsons’ affiliation with the Northeast Parent and Child Society in 2012, the scope of SATRI training and consultation has more than doubled. The combined agencies currently serve more than 12,000 children and family members each year in 46 counties of New York State with 60 programs and over 1,200 staff. Primary service areas include: eEarly cChildhood, eEducation, tTraining and& rResearch, bBehavioral hHealth, fFamily fFoster cCare, rResidential cCare, cCase mManagement, pPrevention and& fFamily pPreservation, and cCareer dDevelopment. As a NCTSN affiliate organizations, the two agencies have continued Parsons’ commitment to “‘learning, adapting, creating, and delivering the most effective services for children and families.”’ In the last two years (2012-2014), Parsons’ sStaff have led, or co-led 13 workshops or presentations at national and regional conferences, and co-authored two articles in peer-reviewed journals and one chapter in a highly regarded book on the treatment of complex trauma in children and adolescents. Training programs, research, and publications continue Parsons’ commitment over the last 12 years to collaborative work with other NCTSN colleagues on disseminating evidence-supported trauma treatment. This has included participation in the NCTSN Affiliate Advisory Group, the Complex Trauma and Integrated Health Care committees, and co-leadership of the NCTSN Resource Parent Workgroup, which developed a highly regarded trauma-informed training used by foster, kinship, and adoptive parents across the United States. Training in Real Life Heroes, the Resource Parent Curriculum, and consultation on implementation of trauma-informed treatment in child welfare and children’s behavioral health programs are available through the Parsons SATRI.
City, State: 
Albany, NY
Contact: 
Jillian Gecewicz
Phone: 
(518) 426-2632

Fordham University & Hunter College Schools of Social Work, Creating and Sustaining the Next Generation of Trauma-Informed Practitioners

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021, 2012 - 2016 and 2009-2012]
Description: 
The Creating & Sustaining the Next Generation of Trauma-Informed Practitioners project will implement “Core Concepts First"—a model that combines foundational developmentally informed trauma knowledge with five treatments designed to treat the pervasive developmental effects of trauma. The center's model will transform NCTSN trauma training; and will increase the capacity of practitioners, schools of social work (SSWs), and community agencies to provide children, adolescents, and their families with the most effective trauma-informed treatment. Working with practitioners, community-based agencies, NCSTN Category II sites, and SSWs, the center will implement its Core Concepts First model, which combines NCTSN’s Core Curriculum on Childhood Trauma (CCCT) with trauma treatment trainings. The goals of the project are to strengthen trauma training by: 1) increasing practitioners’ knowledge of developmental trauma; 2) transforming the ways in which the NCTSN offers trauma treatment training; 3) creating the infrastructure to assist community agencies to become organizationally ready to introduce and sustain trauma treatment; 4) developing the capacity of practitioners and community agencies to provide developmentally informed trauma care for military families and children, and Native American children; and 5) extending the center's local, regional, and national reach. The populations to be served are community agencies, SSWs, current practitioners and future (now student) practitioners who work with children and youth whose early exposure to multiple episodes of interpersonal violence in the context of deprivation and neglect puts them at increased risk for negative developmental consequences across their lifespan. During the four years of the grant, the project will reach more than 1,500 agency practitioners, 30–40 new SSWs, and more than 2,000 students.
City, State: 
West Harrison, NY
Contact: 
Robert Abramovitz

Child HELP Partnership, St. John’s University

Funding Period: 
[2005-2009]
Description: 

Child HELP Partnership, develops and operates trauma-specific mental health programs with its innovative, scientifically supported protocols: 1) On the local level, to provide culturally adapted therapy and prevention services free-of-charge to underserved children and families in the surrounding communities. 2) On the national level, to develop and provide trainings, consultation, and oversight on these therapy methods and prevention programs to mental health professionals as well as the general public. These outreach strategies, evaluation tools, therapies, and prevention trainings are improving care across the country.

To ensure remaining on the scientific cutting edge, the programs incorporate evaluation systems for correcting, refining, and enhancing treatment so that the methodology can be continually modified and improved. The goal is to replicate the Child HELP Partnership Center’s well-documented results across the United States and abroad. The Partnership subscribes to the belief that all children deserve safe and happy childhoods, so each and every one can grow up to be a strong and healthy adult.
 
The name Child HELP Partnership reflects an integrated approach in four areas of focus:
•    Healing children after trauma using evidence-based therapies.
•    Empowering multicultural communities with access to the finest culturally sensitive mental health programs
•    Learning programs—both live and virtual—to educate professionals in the most innovative and effective methodologies
•    Public education for parents and others who interact with children on a regular basis, including educators, coaches, and people within their sphere of influence

Partnerships are formed with children with trauma histories, their families, the community as a whole, colleagues in the mental health field, and caregivers, parents, and others who interact with children regularly. These partnerships unite across cultures with all programs created to be language-accessible and culturally informed.
 

City, State: 
Queens, NY
Contact: 
Elissa J. Brown
Phone: 
(718) 990-2355

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021, 2005 - 2009 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS) develops, adapts, and disseminates trauma-focused assessment and treatment services for traumatized children and adults, with special emphasis on those from low-income and racially diverse neighborhoods who have been exposed to interpersonal and community violence, and who present with the consequences of both acute and chronic traumatic stress.

The Center helps to build the evidence base for promising treatments for trauma in collaboration with other NCTSN member sites, as well as with JBFCS programs. It works to build the capacity of organizations to provide best practice in assessing and treating trauma through training, implementation, and consultation on evidence-based practices. Working with the New York City mental health, child welfare, and educational systems, the Center enhances the ability of professionals within these systems to provide trauma-informed services to the city’s children, and reaches out to businesses and community organizations to provide training in psychological first aid, active coping, and crisis intervention.

JBFCS, an affiliate member of the NCTSN, has been focusing on sustaining evidence-based practice since their renewal grant ended in 2009. Sustainability has been challenging in this fiscal climate and JBFCS has relied on the expertise gained through their involvement with the NCTSN in implementing and sustaining practice in community settings. JBFCS has been able to expand the Sanctuary model to five programs including residential treatment, group home, and domestic violence shelters serving over 1,600 youth and families since 2008. The use of evidence-based practice has also grown from the original implementation of STAIR and Life Skills/ Life Stories to include TFCBT, CPP, SPARCS, and AFCBT in use in 16 programs system wide with over 200 clinicians trained. We have provided crisis interventions to 35 community programs, including schools, synagogues, and community mental health programs reaching over 500 individuals, to help stabilize systems following a critical incident. We have also trained 112 professionals and community members in psychological first aid in order to further create crisis response capacity within the community.

City, State: 
New York, NY
Contact: 
Paula Panzer
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