Affiliate Member Organizations and Individuals

Affiliate Member Organizations and Individuals

Center for Safe and Healthy Families at Primary Children’s Hospital

Funding Period: 
[2001 - 2005]
Description: 
The Center for Safe and Healthy Families at Primary Children’s Hospital provides treatment and services for children who experience trauma related to maltreatment. It has used its grant funds to create and maintain a regional network of child therapists in seven Western states that participated and collaborated in training and consultation. This network is no longer being maintained, but the initiative is being sustained through regional collaboration for training on the prevention, investigation, prosecution, and treatment of child abuse. Safe and Healthy Families continues to use evidence-based trauma treatment practices, maintains active collaboration with other centers, and is currently engaged in helping Utah’s Division of Child and Family Services become a trauma-informed agency.
Contact: 
Julie Bradshaw
Phone: 
(801) 662-3625

DePelchin Children's Center, Child Trauma Program

Funding Period: 
[2008 - 2012 and 2003 - 2007]
Description: 

The DePelchin Children’s Center Child Traumatic Stress Program delivers screening, assessment, case management, and mental health services to traumatized children residing in four southeast counties in Texas. Services are provided through DePelchin’s foster care, adoption/post-adoption, residential treatment, outpatient mental health counseling, and home-based therapy programs. DePelchin focuses on children who are the victims of complex trauma or who suffer from trauma related to traumatic loss, abuse (physical, psychological, or sexual), maltreatment, or neglect. As a result of its participation in the NCTSN, DePelchin has integrated an emphasis on trauma-informed practices throughout the agency. DePelchin works with the community to provide information and training on best practices in child trauma treatment, and to increase the availability of and improve access to mental health services in the Greater Houston metropolitan area. DePelchin has also been actively involved in supporting evacuees in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Re-funded in 2008, DePelchin implemented the Child Trauma Program (DCTP) to mobilize Houston/Gulf Coast communities to help children and families address and overcome the unwanted effects of trauma. The DCTP targeted 1) children affected by trauma and in need of trauma-informed and trauma-focused treatment including referral to culturally adapted services (240 children); 2) children and families impacted by the effects of natural disasters including Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (360 children); and 3) children and families of military personnel deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan (100 families). The primary service area was Greater Harris County, Texas, including Houston, parts of the Gulf Coast, and surrounding counties. The DCTP brought together community leaders serving the target populations to expand access to and expertise in child trauma. Major goals were to: 1) establish a coordinated framework of community services, training, and leadership; 2) expand access to the delivery system of trauma-focused mental health care in the Houston/Gulf Coast area to children and families suffering the long-term effects of natural disaster and deployment trauma; and 3) provide leadership for the dissemination of information on the impact of trauma on children and families and the utilization of trauma-focused interventions.

Contact: 
Jennifer Mills
Phone: 
(713) 802-6209

Serving Children and Adolescents in Need (S.C.A.N.), Border Traumatic Stress Response (Border TSR)

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2005 - 2009]
Description: 
The Border Traumatic Stress Resource Center (BTSRC), a project under Serving Children and Adults in Need Inc. (SCAN) is an affiliate site of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. BTSRC focuses on: 1) enhancing the skills of its workforce to use a trauma lens in everything they do; 2) utilizing trauma-specific interventions that are evidence-based; 3) developing services that concurrently treat traumatic stress and substance abuse; 4) partnering with other organizations around the country to advance services and resources for children and families impacted by trauma; and 5) serving as an information clearinghouse for NCTSN products and training resources for professionals and organizations in Webb County and surrounding areas that desire to become more knowledgeable about trauma-informed care and adept at delivering trauma-informed services.
Contact: 
Luis E. Flores
Phone: 
(956) 724-3177 ext 156

Dee Norton Lowcountry Children's Center

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012]
Description: 
The Dee Norton Lowcounty Children’s Center (DNLCC) is a children’s advocacy center serving Charleston and Berkeley Counties in South Carolina. As a Category III site, the original project aimed to increase access to treatment for children and their non-offending caregivers traumatized by abuse who exhibit or who are at risk for exhibiting sexual behavior problems (SBPs). The goal was to reduce the negative impacts of SBP by increasing the number of direct services provided by clinicians and community partners trained in evidence-supported treatment interventions for 252 children and their non-offending caregivers. The children and caregivers DNLCC serves come from diverse ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds. DNLCC implements the SBP treatments developed by the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, as well as trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, parent-child interaction therapy, and risk reduction family therapy. The Center trains mental health professionals and provides evidence-based treatment plans, case management, and monitoring for children and their families through weekly CAC multidisciplinary team case reviews.
Contact: 
Carole Swiecicki, Ph.D
Phone: 
(843) 723-3600

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Indian Country Child Trauma Center

Funding Period: 
[2003-2007]
Description: 
Established in 2003 at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, the Indian Country Child Trauma Center (ICCTC) develops culturally appropriate interventions to improve treatment and services for children and adolescents in Indian Country who have experienced traumatic events. The ICCTC develops trauma-related treatment protocols based on current evidence-based models that have been adapted for use with American Indian and Alaska Native populations; provides training in the protocols and disseminates the developed materials throughout Indian Country; and provides treatment providers with resources to intervene with America Indian and Alaska Native children and their families exposed to various types of trauma. The Center uses three evidence-based treatment protocols to serve its clients: parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT), treatment for children with sexual behavior problems (CSBP), and trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT).
Contact: 
Barbara L. Bonner
Phone: 
(405) 271-8858

Nationwide Children's Hospital

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012]
Description: 
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, located in Columbus, Ohio, provides trauma treatment services through a range of interventions in a variety of locations. Both the Behavioral Health Division and the Center for Family Safety and Healing offer the trauma treatment services described below. Behavioral Health (BH) Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT) is offered at five locations across the city involving over 15 therapists. Likewise, Parent Child Interaction Training is provided by over 12 therapists in various locations, including in the family home. The most intensive intervention is a model of care that blends TFCBT and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. It is designed to treat youths suffering from serious emotional dysregulation and histories of complex trauma. Other trauma interventions provided by BH services include Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. The contact person for BH is Shari Uncapher, MSW, who can be reached at Shari.Uncapher@nationwidechildrens.org or phone 614-722-2281. The Center for Family Safety and Healing (TCFSH) The Child Advocacy Center (CAC) completed training in 2013 and has fully integrated the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI) into their treatment as usual care for identified families who have completed a CAC assessment. TCFSH has also implemented a small adult services program for victims of family violence that includes domestic violence advocacy, legal services, and adult trauma treatment, and hopes to consult with other NCTSN sites that are implementing both child and adult trauma services. The contact person for TCFSH is Nancy Cunningham, PsyD, who can be reached at Nancy.Cunningham@nationwidechildrens.org or phone: 614-722-6257.
Contact: 
Jack Stevens
Phone: 
(614) 355-2921

Cullen Center for Children, Adolescents, and Families

Funding Period: 
[2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 

The Cullen Center for Children, Adolescents, and Families provides field-tested and evidence-based multisensory, trauma-focused therapies to help traumatized youth and their families reduce trauma symptoms, maximize their daily functioning, and restore their abilities to develop and enjoy healthy interpersonal relationships. Serving northwest Ohio, the Center offers clinic-based services for youth and families exposed to any type of trauma including child abuse, community violence, traumatic loss, serious illness and injuries, and witnessing domestic violence. The Cullen Center works with children birth to age 18 and includes their families and caregivers. The Center works closely with the Lucas County juvenile courts as well as child protective services to provide trauma-informed assessment and therapy. The Cullen Center also provides trauma-informed consultation to the pediatric inpatient units of Toledo Children’s Hospital.
 
The Cullen Center continues its trauma-informed training of community professionals and agencies started during the grant funding period. Training and support are provided to other professionals and community members so that youth and families exposed to trauma can access evidence-based, trauma-focused services.

Contact: 
Adrienne Fricker-Elhai
Phone: 
(419) 291-7919

Parsons Child and Family Center, Heroes Project

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 
Parsons Child and Family Center’s Sidney Albert Training and Research Institute (SATRI) has provided training, consultation, and research as a NCTSN Community Practice sSite since 2002, including national and regional leadership in developing and disseminating evidence-supported trauma and resiliency-focused services for children and families with traumatic stress. The HEROES Project, a SAMHSA-funded NCTSN grant, provided integrated trauma-informed training for six programs at Parsons, the Albany County Children’s Mental Health Clinic, and the Albany County Department of Children, Youth and Families from 2009-2012. The Project trained therapists, foster parents, residential counselors, child protective services workers, and educators, and evaluated of the efficacy of Real Life Heroes (RLH), a trauma and resiliency-focused treatment, to help children and families who had experienced multiple and interpersonal traumas such as emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, domestic violence, losses, or community violence. Results of HEROES Project research are being published in a journal of the American Psychological Association and include statistically significant decreases in child behavior problems and trauma symptoms. The study supported the efficacy of implementing trauma and resiliency-focused treatment in a wide range of child welfare and children’s mental health programs. Following Parsons’ affiliation with the Northeast Parent and Child Society in 2012, the scope of SATRI training and consultation has more than doubled. The combined agencies currently serve more than 12,000 children and family members each year in 46 counties of New York State with 60 programs and over 1,200 staff. Primary service areas include: eEarly cChildhood, eEducation, tTraining and& rResearch, bBehavioral hHealth, fFamily fFoster cCare, rResidential cCare, cCase mManagement, pPrevention and& fFamily pPreservation, and cCareer dDevelopment. As a NCTSN affiliate organizations, the two agencies have continued Parsons’ commitment to “‘learning, adapting, creating, and delivering the most effective services for children and families.”’ In the last two years (2012-2014), Parsons’ sStaff have led, or co-led 13 workshops or presentations at national and regional conferences, and co-authored two articles in peer-reviewed journals and one chapter in a highly regarded book on the treatment of complex trauma in children and adolescents. Training programs, research, and publications continue Parsons’ commitment over the last 12 years to collaborative work with other NCTSN colleagues on disseminating evidence-supported trauma treatment. This has included participation in the NCTSN Affiliate Advisory Group, the Complex Trauma and Integrated Health Care committees, and co-leadership of the NCTSN Resource Parent Workgroup, which developed a highly regarded trauma-informed training used by foster, kinship, and adoptive parents across the United States. Training in Real Life Heroes, the Resource Parent Curriculum, and consultation on implementation of trauma-informed treatment in child welfare and children’s behavioral health programs are available through the Parsons SATRI.
Contact: 
Richard Kagan
Phone: 
(518) 426-2600

Child HELP Partnership, St. John’s University

Funding Period: 
[2005-2009]
Description: 

Child HELP Partnership, develops and operates trauma-specific mental health programs with its innovative, scientifically supported protocols: 1) On the local level, to provide culturally adapted therapy and prevention services free-of-charge to underserved children and families in the surrounding communities. 2) On the national level, to develop and provide trainings, consultation, and oversight on these therapy methods and prevention programs to mental health professionals as well as the general public. These outreach strategies, evaluation tools, therapies, and prevention trainings are improving care across the country.

To ensure remaining on the scientific cutting edge, the programs incorporate evaluation systems for correcting, refining, and enhancing treatment so that the methodology can be continually modified and improved. The goal is to replicate the Child HELP Partnership Center’s well-documented results across the United States and abroad. The Partnership subscribes to the belief that all children deserve safe and happy childhoods, so each and every one can grow up to be a strong and healthy adult.
 
The name Child HELP Partnership reflects an integrated approach in four areas of focus:
•    Healing children after trauma using evidence-based therapies.
•    Empowering multicultural communities with access to the finest culturally sensitive mental health programs
•    Learning programs—both live and virtual—to educate professionals in the most innovative and effective methodologies
•    Public education for parents and others who interact with children on a regular basis, including educators, coaches, and people within their sphere of influence

Partnerships are formed with children with trauma histories, their families, the community as a whole, colleagues in the mental health field, and caregivers, parents, and others who interact with children regularly. These partnerships unite across cultures with all programs created to be language-accessible and culturally informed.
 

Contact: 
Elissa J. Brown
Phone: 
(718) 990-2355

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services

Funding Period: 
[2005 - 2009 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS) develops, adapts, and disseminates trauma-focused assessment and treatment services for traumatized children and adults, with special emphasis on those from low-income and racially diverse neighborhoods who have been exposed to interpersonal and community violence, and who present with the consequences of both acute and chronic traumatic stress.

The Center helps to build the evidence base for promising treatments for trauma in collaboration with other NCTSN member sites, as well as with JBFCS programs. It works to build the capacity of organizations to provide best practice in assessing and treating trauma through training, implementation, and consultation on evidence-based practices. Working with the New York City mental health, child welfare, and educational systems, the Center enhances the ability of professionals within these systems to provide trauma-informed services to the city’s children, and reaches out to businesses and community organizations to provide training in psychological first aid, active coping, and crisis intervention.

JBFCS, an affiliate member of the NCTSN, has been focusing on sustaining evidence-based practice since their renewal grant ended in 2009. Sustainability has been challenging in this fiscal climate and JBFCS has relied on the expertise gained through their involvement with the NCTSN in implementing and sustaining practice in community settings. JBFCS has been able to expand the Sanctuary model to five programs including residential treatment, group home, and domestic violence shelters serving over 1,600 youth and families since 2008. The use of evidence-based practice has also grown from the original implementation of STAIR and Life Skills/ Life Stories to include TFCBT, CPP, SPARCS, and AFCBT in use in 16 programs system wide with over 200 clinicians trained. We have provided crisis interventions to 35 community programs, including schools, synagogues, and community mental health programs reaching over 500 individuals, to help stabilize systems following a critical incident. We have also trained 112 professionals and community members in psychological first aid in order to further create crisis response capacity within the community.

Contact: 
Christina Grosso
Phone: 
(212) 632-4698
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