For Mental Health/Medical/Child Welfare Professionals

It is a priority to strengthen the professional systems to support LGBTQ youth after sexual assault and other traumas that these youth commonly experience. This 13-minute video features five LGBTQ youth who discuss details of their own trauma experiences related to their respective LGBTQ identities, how they gained resilience, and how professionals helped them in this regard.

 

This project was funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The views, policies, and opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of SAMHSA or HHS. Trauma services providers assist families exposed to trauma by giving support, fostering healthy relationships, aiding with problem solving, and helping with processing trauma.

We developed this tip sheet to encourage providers to share power in the context of trauma-responsive practice. If you are a family member, you may want to share this resource and your thoughts about it with current or future service providers. Thank you for reading! — Partnering with Youth and Families Committee, National Child Traumatic Stress Netw

The relationship with a parent or primary caregiver is critical to a child’s sense of self, safety, and trust. However, many children experience the loss of a caregiver, either permanently due to death, or for varying amounts of time due to other circumstances. Children may develop posttraumatic responses when separated from their caregiver. The following provides information and suggestions for helping children who experience traumatic separation from a caregiver.

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