For Mental Health/Medical/Child Welfare Professionals

The video introduces the viewer to the needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth who
have experienced trauma. You may use the video as a training tool, for example, during a staff meeting or in supervision
with staff. You can show the video in its entirety or in segments.
However you use this resource, be sure to allow time for discussion after viewing the video. Questions to
facilitate growth, learning, and change follow.

For more than a decade after 9/11, United States military families faced historic stressors in conjunction with the deployment of service members to overseas operations. Most military families have coped remarkably well both during and after extended separations and even repeated deployments. Many other military families are still struggling with the effects of uncertainty, change, and loss while serving.

“Testifying in court can be a difficult and stressful experience for clinicians. But judges and lawyers are not experts in child development or the impact of trauma on children. The knowledge clinicians bring to bear is essential if the legal system is to have any hope of making sound decisions that will serve children’s interests. By educating the court through testifying, clinicians provide an invaluable service to the legal system and, most importantly, to children.”

Frank E. Vandervort

Clinical Professor of Law

University of Michigan Law School

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