Child Welfare Trauma Referral Tool

Submitted by mholliday on Wed, 08/28/2013 - 13:57

Overview

Acronym: 
CWT
Author(s): 
Taylor, N., Steinberg, A., &Wilson, C.
Citation: 

Taylor, N., Steinburg, A., & Wilson, C. (2006). The Child Welfare Trauma Referral Tool. San Diego, CA: Chadwick Center for Children and Families, Rady Children's Hospital - San Diego.

Obtain(Email/Website): 
To obtain permission to use the Child Welfare Trauma Referral Tool, please contact Lisa Conradi, at lconradi@rchsd.org or 858-576-1700, ext. 6008.
Cost: 
Free
Copyrighted: 
No
Measure Description: 

This measure is designed to help child welfare workers make more trauma-informed decisions about the need for referral to trauma-specific and general mental health services. It is to be completed by the child welfare worker through record review and key informants (i.e., natural parent, foster parent, child therapist, school-aged children or adolescents if appropriate, and other significant individuals in the child's life). History of exposure to a variety of types of trauma, the severity of the child's traumatic stress reactions, attachments problems, behaviors requiring immediate stabilization, and the severity of the child's other reactions/behaviors/functioning are documented. Strategies for making recommendations to general or trauma-specific mental health services by linking the child's experiences to their reactions are then given.


Domain(s) Assessed : 
Trauma Exposure/Reminders
Traumatic Stress
Externalizing Symptoms
Relationships & Attachment
Age Range: 
1-20
Measure Type: 
Screening
# of Items: 
56
Measure Format: 
Other
Other Measure Format: 
Provider completed based on existing case data
Average Time to Complete (min): 
20
Reporter Type: 
Self
Other Reporter Type: 
Parent/Caregiver
Average Time to Score (min): 
5
Periodicity: 
It is recommended that the tool be administered when a child comes into the child welfare system and then at the following times: Change in Placement, New Trauma Reported, Problematic Reactions/Behaviors Reported, and/or when the child welfare worker sees fit.
Response Format: 

This varies throughout the measure, most are yes/no/suspected and then ages are added to some items and demographic items are included as well.

Materials Needed: 
Paper/Pencil
Information Provided: 
Areas of Concern/Risks
Other Information Provided: 
Using the answers to the questions on the tool, the child welfare worker then uses a flow chart and referral guidelines included in the tool to determine whether a Trauma-Specific Mental Health Referral, Specific Mental Health Referral (e.g., hospitalization, substance abuse treatment, or eating disorder treatment), General Mental Health Referral, or No Mental Health Referral is recommended for the child in question.

Training

Administration Training: 
Manual/Video
Training to Interpret: 
Manual/Video

Parallel/Alternate Forms

Parallel Form: 
No
Alternate Form: 
No
Different Age Forms: 
No
Altered Version Forms: 
Yes
Describe Alternative Forms: 

There is a shorter version of the form available.

 

Psychometrics

Notes on Psychometric Norms: 

No psychometrics have been collected on the tool.

Population Information

Population Used For Measure Development: 

For use by child welfare caseworkers with children ages 0-18 who are involved in the child welfare system.

Measure has demonstrated evidence of reliability and validity in which populations?: 
Physical Abuse
Sexual Abuse
Medical Trauma
Witness Death
Natural Disaster
Domestic Violence
Community Violence
Traumatic Loss (Death)
Kidnapping/Hostage
War/Combat
Neglect
Accidents
Assault
Imprisonment
Immigration Related Trauma
Terrorism

Pros & Cons/References

Pros: 
  • This measure allows the caseworker to organize information that they have already gathered as part of the investigation in order to determine if a child needs to be referred for a trauma-specific treatment. It does not require an additional interview with the child or caregiver in order to make this determination.
  • The tool provides a "trauma-informed lens" for caseworkers to use when making decisions.
Cons: 
  • There is no established reliability and validity on this measure.
  • Since neither the child nor the caregiver are informants on this measure and a specific interview is not used, it is possible that the caseworker would be missing crucial information that would assist them in completing the tool and determining the kind of treatment that would be appropriate for a given child.
Developer of Review: 
Lisa Conradi, PsyD.
Last Updated: 
Wed, 08/28/2013
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