Current and Affiliated NCTSN Organizational Members

Below is a roster of organizational NCTSN members arranged by state. This list includes current grantees as well as affiliated members—former grantees who have maintained their ties to the Network. For each site the funding period(s) by Federal fiscal year, abstract, and contact information are listed. This roster will change as the funding status of these sites changes.

View a map (PDF) of Network members and affiliates.

To see a listing of individual affiliated professionals, click here.

Click here (PDF) for a complete listing of Network members by federal fiscal year. This listing includes current grantees, affiliates, and formerly funded sites that are no longer active in the Network.

To search for Network centers by state, select a state from the drop-down menu and click "Apply."

Funding Period: 
[2005-2009]
Description: 

Community PARTNERS (Prevention of Adverse Reactions to Negative Events and Related Stress) at St. John's University developed and sustains a community-wide network of providers implementing trauma-informed, evidence-based services. Primary care personnel provide these services to underserved, inner-city traumatized children throughout Queens and eastern Brooklyn, New York. Each year, more than 29,000 children are screened and more than 1,500 abused and/or bereaved children receive assessment and treatment services. The majority of these children are Latino, African American, Caribbean American, or Asian.

Community PARTNERS worked with members of the local community and NCTSN to 1) adapt screening, assessment, and treatment procedures and components to be culturally informed and language accessible; 2) train pediatrics staff and community providers to screen and refer children for child sexual abuse (CSA), child physical abuse (CPA), and traumatic bereavement (TB); 3) train mental health staff to provide evidence-based, culturally informed assessments and treatment of children exposed to CSA, CPA, and TB; 4) identify leadership staff of the mental health clinics who then inform, promote, and sustain the program; and 5) extend the training on and implementation of trauma-informed, evidence-based services beyond Community PARTNERS into the Queens and eastern Brooklyn communities.

In 2007, the program expanded to include a second site at the Child Abuse Program at Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters (CHKD) in Norfolk, Virginia. The CHKD site is implementing the project with military families. This collaboration allows the NCTSN to gain information on working with traumatized children from military families, and provides the opportunity for creating collaborations among trauma providers and military service providers (e.g., Family Advocacy Program, Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Naval Criminal Investigative Services). Finally, given the mobile nature of military family life, the collaboration will help provide additional information on methods of adapting the evidence-based services to improve access among military children (e.g., cross-site trainings or improved continuity of care among service providers at different commands).

Contact: 
Elissa J. Brown
Phone: 
(718) 990-2355

The Children's Center, Trauma Program for Families and Young Children

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2009-2012]
Description: 
The Trauma Program for Families with Young Children will provide evidence-based trauma treatments to children aged 0–8 living in four metropolitan counties (Salt Lake, Davis, Utah, and Weber). Participants in the program will include children who have suffered trauma (including sexual, physical abuse, or neglect, and witnessing severe domestic violence) or traumatic grief. A specific focus will be on military children suffering from grief or from the return of an impaired parent/caregiver; other populations will include refugee children suffering from the loss of their home and extended family members, and children in domestic violence shelters. During the four-year program, approximately 6,000 children will be screened for trauma; and of those screened, 3,000 will receive trauma-informed mental health assessments. Additionally, 240 military children will be treated. By the end of the grant, 420 children and families will receive evidence-based trauma treatment.
Contact: 
Dough Goldsmith
Phone: 
(801) 582-5534

The Edmund Ervin Pediatric Center, Mid-Maine Child Trauma Network

Funding Period: 
[2002 - 2005]
Description: 
Mid-Maine Child Trauma Network has worked closely with the Maine Department of Health and Human Services and private mental health service providers/agencies to strengthen the infrastructure of rural community services to children who have experienced traumatic stress and their families. Network membership is open to organizations that serve traumatized children and their families. Network activities include: 1) identifying community resources, needs, and coordination opportunities among foster care, domestic violence, emergency health care, mental health, and terrorism/disaster response services; 2) piloting triage assessment and outcome evaluation protocols in the above areas; 3) providing training and consultation to increase trauma assessment and intervention resources; and 4) facilitating interagency development and coordination of child trauma services.
Contact: 
Stephen Meister
Phone: 
(207) 872-4163

Uniformed Services University, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The challenges of military children and families are substantial and require greater understanding, education, and services than they are currently receiving. Some of the most severe experiences that military children face are related to wartime stress: specifically, deployment of military parents to combat, parental injury or illness, or parental death. Little if any data exist in many of these areas. The Uniformed Services University Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress (USU CSTS) Child and Family Program is responsible for developing knowledge related to military childhood experiences, developing effective public education materials, and expanding and studying effective intervention strategies, all using a strength-based approach.

Though USU CSTS does not receive funding from SAMHSA, it functions as a Treatment and Services Adaptation Center within the NCTSN. The center serves as a consultant to the Network, acts as a knowledge development and dissemination center, and creates trauma-focused products specific to military families.

Contact: 
Stephen Cozza
Phone: 
(301) 295-2470
Email: 

University of Arkansas Medical SCIS, Little Rock, The Arkansas Network for Early Stress and Trauma (NEST)

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The Arkansas Network for Early Stress and Trauma (NEST) will: 1) provide culturally competent, client-centered, family-focused, evidence-based assessment and treatment—including Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP)—to 340 traumatized children aged 0–5 referred by child welfare professionals, early childhood educators, military partners and/or child advocates; 2) train, coach, and monitor fidelity in at least 70 mental health professionals to implement evidence-based interventions targeting young children; and 3) develop training materials, resource kits, and other tools to enhance trauma-informed practices for children aged 0–5 in court, child welfare, child advocacy, early childhood education, veteran, and military systems.

Contact: 
Benjamin Sigel
Phone: 
(501) 364-1592
Email: 

University of California, Davis, UC Davis - PCIT Training Center

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012]
Description: 
The UC Davis - PCIT Training Center project will further the dissemination of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) by developing and testing a web course (PCITWeb) designed to inform professionals who may want to acquire and/or enhance PCIT skill involvement. The center will also develop a Learning Collaborative that focuses on the use of PCIT with young traumatized children and their families; and will create several products to enhance and support clinicians' use of PCIT in a broad range of settings (e.g., community mental health centers, private practice, in-home services providers). Three pathways will be used to disseminate knowledge and skills related to the application of PCIT: 1) create a 10-hour culturally competent web course for mental health providers who serve traumatized children and their families; 2) enroll ten agencies in PCIT Competency Achievement Training to deliver PCIT services and train them to use the 10-hour web courses in their communities; and 3) develop PCIT products that will support the effective use of PCIT. These objectives will be achieved through extensive collaboration with NCTSN members, and will include formation of a PCIT Learning Collaborative, a PCIT Workgroup, and a PCIT Family Consumer group.
Contact: 
Anthony Urquiza
Phone: 
(916) 734-7833

University of California, San Francisco, Early Trauma Treatment Network

Funding Period: 
[2012 -2016, 2009 - 2012, 2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 
The Early Trauma Treatment Network (ETTN): Raising the Standard of Care for Young Children 0–5 will address the needs of traumatized young children and preschoolers by raising their standard of care and by enabling increased access to evidence-based trauma treatment for them. ETTN will work to build early trauma competence in the systems serving these children. Statistically, young children and preschoolers have a higher exposure to trauma; and they are the most defenseless due to developmental vulnerability, and dependency on parents and/or caregivers. ETTN will: 1) address training and service gaps by engaging in activities that promote workforce development; 2) create culturally competent products, resources, and training protocols; and 3) build mechanisms for collaboration across the mental health, pediatric care, early childhood education, early intervention, child welfare, judicial, and military systems. ETTN is a collaborative of four national programs. All ETTN sites will provide training in Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), a manualized, evidence-based intervention for young children. To improve access to services and to raise the standard of care for traumatized young children and preschoolers, ETTN will build training infrastructure and conduct five Learning Collaboratives with NCTSN Centers and community-based programs—focusing on American Indian providers, military family providers, distance learning technologies, Train-the-Trainer Learning Collaboratives to increase CPP capacity in training and supervision, and national Learning Collaboratives with tracks for Spanish-speaking providers. Additionally, ETTN will create educational and training materials for parents, childcare providers, and service providers for military families; and will collaborate with the NCCTS and with NCTSN Centers in cross-site evaluation, training, and dissemination. Over the course of the grant, ETTN will provide training related to early childhood trauma to 40,000+ service providers and CPP training to a minimum of 480 mental health practitioners.
Contact: 
Alicia Lieberman
Phone: 
(415) 206-5979

University of Colorado Denver, Kempe Evidence-Based Mental Health Initiative

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The Kempe Evidence-Based Mental Health Initiative will be developed by the Kempe Imhoff Clinic, which provides mental health services to trauma-exposed children and families referred from several community sites. Project goals include: 1) continuing clinical services at the clinic and expanding the evidence-based treatments (EBTs) offered by clinical staff, e.g., Alternatives for Families­A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT); 2) increasing capacity of the clinic’s military partners to identify children and families in need of mental health services, and developing specialty services for military families in the clinic; and 3) expanding the Colorado Evidence-Based Training Initiative to train mental health professionals (civilian and military) and child welfare professionals in trauma-informed, evidence-based treatment. The program expects to provide mental health services to 1,540 children/families and training to 760 professionals throughout the Western Mountain region.

Contact: 
Kimberly Shipman
Phone: 
(303) 864-5366

University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Center for Trauma Recovery and Juvenile Justice

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The Center for Trauma Recovery and Juvenile Justice (CTRJJ) will bring together national leaders in the child traumatic stress field to develop and widely disseminate evidence-based trauma interventions and trauma-informed services for youth and families exposed to domestic and community violence who are involved in the court, juvenile justice, and law enforcement systems. Three evidence-based interventions will be disseminated to ten sites each and tested for sustainability in three parallel initiatives by model developers: Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy-Adolescents (TARGET-A), and Trauma and Grief Components Therapy-Adolescents (TGCT-A), which are the two most widely disseminated evidence-based trauma interventions for violence-exposed youth in juvenile justice; and Families OverComing Under Stress (FOCUS), an evidence-based trauma intervention for violence-exposed families. Additionally, two other Network-developed juvenile justice trauma-informed services curricula/tools—Think Trauma and Judges’ Benchcard—will be adapted and disseminated across court, juvenile justice, and law enforcement systems in ten sites. Network-developed fact sheets, webinars, and professional/public policy publications will be updated and extended to address key underserved, violence-exposed, justice-involved youth (including those who are involved in gangs, sex trafficking victims, sex offenders, and substance abusers) and youth of color. These initiatives will involve 50 Community Treatment and Services (CTS) Centers or non-Network sites with 300 service agencies in training 5,000 multidisciplinary justice-affiliated child service providers in at least 15 states.

Contact: 
Julian Ford
Phone: 
(860) 679-8778
Email: 

University of Illinois at Chicago, Urban Youth Trauma Center, Institute for Juvenile Research

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2009 - 2012]
Description: 
The Urban Youth Trauma Center (UYTC): Treatment Collaborative for Trauma and Violence (TCTV) will promote and disseminate comprehensive, integrated, and coordinated care for multiproblem, at-risk youth affected by trauma and violence involved with delinquency or the justice system. The program will strengthen both service system connectivity and community-based best practices for trauma-informed intervention and prevention, particularly among court judges, juvenile justice probation officers, and law enforcement staff. TCTV goals are to: 1) increase awareness about the needs of traumatized youth who are affected by community and domestic violence—and who are involved with court, juvenile justice, and law enforcement systems—while emphasizing the enhancement of community resources and service system collaboration; 2) disseminate trauma-informed treatment approaches designed for multiproblem youth experiencing traumatic stress, violence exposure, and co-occurring substance abuse—using Trauma Systems Therapy for Adolescent Substance Abuse (TST-SA)—and disruptive behavior problems, using STRONG Families; and 3) provide training and consultation to facilitate service system and community resource collaboration, using a socioecologically based and trauma-informed model of collaboration developed by UYTC, called YOUTH-CAN (Youth Overcoming Urban Trauma and Healing through Community Action Network), which promotes the use of best practices for trauma intervention and violence prevention among youth service providers within targeted communities.
Contact: 
Jaleel Abdul-Adil
Phone: 
(312) 413-1371