NCTSN Center Products

The ACS-NYU Children’s Trauma Institute has developed practice briefs for child welfare providers and other stakeholders seeking to develop trauma-informed practice.  These briefs – focusing on addressing secondary traumatic stress experienced by child welfare staff, easing children’s transitions into foster care, and working with parents who have been impacted by trauma – provide information on work the Institute and other jurisdictions have done in these areas, and recommendations for policy and practice improvements.

The ACS-NYU Children’s Trauma Institute has developed practice briefs for child welfare providers and other stakeholders seeking to develop trauma-informed practice.  These briefs – focusing on addressing secondary traumatic stress experienced by child welfare staff, easing children’s transitions into foster care, and working with parents who have been impacted by trauma – provide information on work the Institute and other jurisdictions have done in these areas, and recommendations for policy and practice improvements.

The ACS-NYU Children’s Trauma Institute has developed practice briefs for child welfare providers and other stakeholders seeking to develop trauma-informed practice.  These briefs – focusing on addressing secondary traumatic stress experienced by child welfare staff, easing children’s transitions into foster care, and working with parents who have been impacted by trauma – provide information on work the Institute and other jurisdictions have done in these areas, and recommendations for policy and practice improvements.

The Resilience Alliance: Promoting Resilience and Reducing Secondary Trauma Among Welfare Staff ─Participant handbook
This handbook accompanies the Resilience Alliance training manual, which was developed by the ACS-NYU Children’s Trauma Institute in New York City, a Network member. The Resilience Alliance is an intervention developed to reduce secondary traumatic stress and increase resilience of child welfare staff, with the goal of reducing attrition and improving case practice. This handbook is for the intervention participants’ use.
The Resilience Alliance: Promoting Resilience and Reducing Secondary Trauma Among Welfare Staff ─Training Manual
This manual was developed by the ACS-NYU Children’s Trauma Institute in New York City, a Network member. It describes an intervention developed to reduce secondary traumatic stress and increase resilience of child welfare staff, with the goal of reducing attrition and improving case practice. This manual provides information about how the intervention was delivered, as well as a guide and materials for facilitators’ use.

"Impact of Terrorism on Children" is a chapter in Kaplan & Sadock's Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry. The chapter was written by four NCTSN members.

The CARES Institute for Children's Support developed this bilingual card game to help children and caregivers talk about child sexual abuse, physical abuse, and/or domestic violence. It is a clinical tool for use by therapists working with families. Use this form to order copies of the game, or contact carestraining@umdnj.edu for more information.

In an effort to improve services for Latino/Hispanic children and families who have experienced trauma, the Chadwick Center for Children and Families in San Diego, California, as part of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN), has coordinated the development of Adaptation Guidelines for Serving Latino Children and Families Affected by Trauma.

Community Dialogue and Needs Assessment for Trauma Informed Systems of Care for Resettled African Refugee Youth in New Hampshire is a joint report of NCTSN member the New Hampshire Project for Adolescent Trauma Treatment and the Wellesley Centers for Women. The report documents the results of a project that engaged African refugee youth, community members, and service providers in identifying the steps needed to create trauma-informed systems of care for African refugee youth living in New Hampshire.

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board for Children and Family services, an NCTSN member, developed My Identity, My SELF, a curriculum that seeks to improve services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and questioning youth in residential treatment. The curriculum has modules for treatment center staff and for LGBTQ youth in treatment and their straight peers.
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