Affiliate Member Organizations and Individuals

Affiliate Member Organizations and Individuals

Child HELP Partnership, St. John’s University

Funding Period: 
[2005-2009]
Description: 

Child HELP Partnership, develops and operates trauma-specific mental health programs with its innovative, scientifically supported protocols: 1) On the local level, to provide culturally adapted therapy and prevention services free-of-charge to underserved children and families in the surrounding communities. 2) On the national level, to develop and provide trainings, consultation, and oversight on these therapy methods and prevention programs to mental health professionals as well as the general public. These outreach strategies, evaluation tools, therapies, and prevention trainings are improving care across the country.

To ensure remaining on the scientific cutting edge, the programs incorporate evaluation systems for correcting, refining, and enhancing treatment so that the methodology can be continually modified and improved. The goal is to replicate the Child HELP Partnership Center’s well-documented results across the United States and abroad. The Partnership subscribes to the belief that all children deserve safe and happy childhoods, so each and every one can grow up to be a strong and healthy adult.
 
The name Child HELP Partnership reflects an integrated approach in four areas of focus:
•    Healing children after trauma using evidence-based therapies.
•    Empowering multicultural communities with access to the finest culturally sensitive mental health programs
•    Learning programs—both live and virtual—to educate professionals in the most innovative and effective methodologies
•    Public education for parents and others who interact with children on a regular basis, including educators, coaches, and people within their sphere of influence

Partnerships are formed with children with trauma histories, their families, the community as a whole, colleagues in the mental health field, and caregivers, parents, and others who interact with children regularly. These partnerships unite across cultures with all programs created to be language-accessible and culturally informed.
 

Contact: 
Elissa J. Brown
Phone: 
(718) 990-2355

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services

Funding Period: 
[2005 - 2009 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS) develops, adapts, and disseminates trauma-focused assessment and treatment services for traumatized children and adults, with special emphasis on those from low-income and racially diverse neighborhoods who have been exposed to interpersonal and community violence, and who present with the consequences of both acute and chronic traumatic stress.

The Center helps to build the evidence base for promising treatments for trauma in collaboration with other NCTSN member sites, as well as with JBFCS programs. It works to build the capacity of organizations to provide best practice in assessing and treating trauma through training, implementation, and consultation on evidence-based practices. Working with the New York City mental health, child welfare, and educational systems, the Center enhances the ability of professionals within these systems to provide trauma-informed services to the city’s children, and reaches out to businesses and community organizations to provide training in psychological first aid, active coping, and crisis intervention.

JBFCS, an affiliate member of the NCTSN, has been focusing on sustaining evidence-based practice since their renewal grant ended in 2009. Sustainability has been challenging in this fiscal climate and JBFCS has relied on the expertise gained through their involvement with the NCTSN in implementing and sustaining practice in community settings. JBFCS has been able to expand the Sanctuary model to five programs including residential treatment, group home, and domestic violence shelters serving over 1,600 youth and families since 2008. The use of evidence-based practice has also grown from the original implementation of STAIR and Life Skills/ Life Stories to include TFCBT, CPP, SPARCS, and AFCBT in use in 16 programs system wide with over 200 clinicians trained. We have provided crisis interventions to 35 community programs, including schools, synagogues, and community mental health programs reaching over 500 individuals, to help stabilize systems following a critical incident. We have also trained 112 professionals and community members in psychological first aid in order to further create crisis response capacity within the community.

Contact: 
Christina Grosso
Phone: 
(212) 632-4698
Funding Period: 
[2002-2005]
Description: 
Originally founded as an orphanage, the Andrus Children's Center is a treatment, education, and research facility that serves families and children through campus-based programs, community-based initiatives, and mental health programs. The use of the Sanctuary Model of trauma-informed residential care is a key feature of Andrus's work. Andrus joined the NCTSN as a member of the Children's Trauma Consoritum of Westchester, a collaborative with the Center for Preventive Psychiatry, Fordham University's Children's First, and the Westchester Medical Center's Behavioral Health Center.
Contact: 
Kerron Norman
Phone: 
(914) 965-3700 x1258
Email: 

North Shore LIJ Health System’s Department of Psychiatry

Funding Period: 
[2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 
North Shore LIJ Health System’s Department of Psychiatry (formerly North Shore University Hospital’s Adolescent Trauma Treatment Development Center) helps alleviate the impact of traumatic stress on children, adolescents, families, and community schools through its Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s outpatient services, school-based consultation program, and Health System programs specifically focusing on the families of military and law enforcement personnel and veterans. North Shore has a long history of responding to community needs after disasters as well as utilization of evidence-based, trauma-informed treatment models. It provides trauma-related training to psychology externs, interns, and post-doctoral fellows as well as providing staff and community education.
Contact: 
Peter D’Amico
Phone: 
(718) 470-8352
Email: 

CARES Institute at Rowan University

Funding Period: 
[2003-2007]
Description: 
The CARES Institute at Rowan University is a nationally recognized facility for its leadership in the development of evidence-based services for children who have suffered child abuse. Through this initiative, the institute disseminates Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), enhances public and professional efforts toward early identification and protection of potential abuse victims, and improves children's access to evidence-based and developmentally and culturally sensitive treatment services. Through collaboration with local constituencies and NCTSN members, the institute helps increase awareness of, identify obstacles to, and improve access to effective mental health services for children who have suffered abuse or other violent crime. The CARES Institute has also developed and tested an intervention for physical abuse. In addition, the institute provides ongoing training and consultation on TF-CBT and physical abuse to mental health staff at New Jersey's three other Child Abuse Diagnostic and Treatment Centers and to centers associated with the NCTSN.
Contact: 
Esther Deblinger
Phone: 
(856) 566-7036

Dartmouth Trauma Interventions Research Center, New Hampshire Bridge Project

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2005 - 2009]
Description: 
As an NCTSN member, the Dartmouth Trauma Interventions Research Center (DTIRC) brought evidence-based treatment (TF CBT) for traumatized children to every community mental health center in New Hampshire. Through SAMHSA funding and grants from the New Hampshire Endowment for Health and the Fidelity Foundation, DTIRC established a videoconference network to allow weekly supervision of clinicians by DTIRC and national experts. DTIRC also implemented Project Prevent, which enhanced access to evidence-based evaluation and trauma treatment (CPP) for children aged 0-5 in four agencies across New Hampshire. Its NCTSN-sponsored New Hampshire Bridge project allowed implementation of mental health screening and treatment referral processes across five New Hampshire juvenile justice courts by partnering with family court judges. The most recent NCTSN project entailed a highly productive collaboration with the New Hampshire Division of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF) in which the Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) increased placement stability for children in foster care through trauma-sensitive practices in child welfare. Most recently, DTIRC has partnered with DCYF on two Administration for Children and Families (ACF) grants designed to develop a collaborative trauma-informed child welfare system that effectively addresses the well-being needs of involved youth. The Partners for Change project aims to improve the social and emotional well-being of children in the New Hampshire child welfare system, including juvenile justice youth, through universal screening, assessment, evidence-based treatment, progress monitoring, and psychotropic medication oversight. New Hampshire Adoption Preparation and Preservation will focus on the creation of a child serving system in which adoptive children and families have access to trauma-informed, adoption-competent services and supports so that they have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to meet the child’s needs and ensure a successful adoption.
Contact: 
Kay Jankowski
Phone: 
(603) 653-0738

Catholic Charities, Inc., Trauma Recovery for Youth (TRY)

Funding Period: 
[2007 - 2011 and 2003 - 2007]
Description: 

Catholic Charities, Inc. and a constellation of Mississippi State government and nonprofit organizations joined the NCTSN to serve a wide range of urban, rural, and geographically isolated child trauma survivors. The first funding period was dedicated to providing evidence-based trauma training to Catholic Charities clinicians in home-based, residential, therapeutic foster care, unaccompanied refugee minor, and outpatient (Solomon) centers, and to providing cutting edge information to the community at large.

Based on the lessons learned through participation in a trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) learning collaborative in its first funding period, TRY implemented a Gulf Coast TF-CBT learning collaborative to build capacity in agencies to treat children and families affected by trauma after the region’s devastation from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Catholic Charities went on to develop a statewide trauma-informed system of care to meet the needs of children and families throughout Mississippi. Evidence-based practices were disseminated to public mental health clinicians via the Learning Collaborative model, with an emphasis on systems serving those least likely to have access to quality mental health care. Catholic Charities collaborated with NCTSN experts to provide TF-CBT learning collaboratives and Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS) learning collaboratives, as well as participating in training on the treatment of physically abused children. Currently, Catholic Charities clinicians serve as trauma experts in Mississippi and continue providing direct services to adults and children affected by trauma.

Contact: 
Christina Bach
Phone: 
(601) 326-3711

Gulf Coast Mental Health Center, Trauma Informed Disaster and Evidence-Based Services (TIDES)

Funding Period: 
[2008 - 2012]
Description: 

Trauma Informed Disaster and Evidence-Based Services (TIDES) will develop proficiency in evidence-based trauma practices and will treat Katrina survivors by centrally organizing staff to be prepared for inevitable hurricanes. The target population is children of military personnel living on the two military bases on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

The project will address other therapy needs specific to this population including incorporating Child Parent Conjoint-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CPC-CBT) and Trauma Assessment Pathways (TAP) for assessing and addressing already traumatized populations, and Psychological First Aid (PFA) for preparing for future disasters within their site. Clinicians will educate the community on trauma and formally centralize crisis response for future events. TIDES staff will continue training to become trauma-based experts, and will sustain gains made in TF-CBT by continuing to provide therapy to a traumatized region while working with TF-CBT co-developer Esther Deblinger to modify the therapy to include trauma specific to military families. Four TIDES therapists currently trained in TF-CBT will be developed as experts for the region.

Contact: 
Shelley S. Foreman
Phone: 
(228) 865-1734

Bethany Christian Services, Project Return Home

Funding Period: 
[2008 - 2012]
Description: 

Project Return Home expands the reach and impact of Bethany Christian Services’ existing child trauma center to serve urban Grand Rapids and the metropolitan Kent County area of West Central Michigan. The target population is traumatized children aged 3-18 who have been removed from their homes due to child abuse, neglect, or maltreatment, and who live in foster care or other out-of-home placement. Trauma treatment will also be delivered to their parents, most of whom struggle with their own unresolved sources of childhood trauma. The project will adapt/replicate an empirically based trauma-informed treatment model to help foster children achieve four measurable outcomes: 1) reduce behavioral problems extending from childhood trauma; 2) increase the rate and timeliness of child-family reunification; 3) reduce the number of disrupted foster placements; and 4) reduce the rates of recidivism for repeat out-of-home placement of children.

Bethany partners with the Child and Adolescent Traumatic Stress Center of Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, to replicate the trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) model for foster children, and will draw on the resources of its own Child and Family Traumatic Stress Center, which has successfully implemented two other U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-funded clinical models for treating traumatized adopted youth and youth aging out of the foster care system.

Contact: 
Mark Peterson
Phone: 
(616) 224-7617

National Center on Family Homelessness at the American Institutes for Research

Funding Period: 
[2003-2007]
Description: 
The National Center on Family Homelessness at the American Institutes for Research has led the nation in developing and disseminating knowledge about trauma and violence and addressing its effects on homeless families for more than 20 years. As a member of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network from 2003 to 2007, the National Center and its partners formed the National Collaborative for Trauma-Surviving Homeless Children to address the unmet trauma-related needs of homeless children and their parents. The National Center has developed a Trauma-Informed Organizational Curriculum for use in homeless service settings, settings serving women, veterans, and children, and organizations serving displaced populations. The central component of the curriculum is a Trauma-Informed Organizational Self-Assessment that includes concrete practices or benchmarks of trauma-informed care for special populations, and serves as a guide for agencies to begin the process of adopting a trauma-informed approach agency-wide. The National Center provides training and technical assistance on traumatic stress, trauma-informed care, and secondary traumatic stress and self-care both locally and nationally, and provides individualized consultation to support organizations in implementing a trauma-informed service model.
Contact: 
Kathleen Guarino
Phone: 
(781) 373-7066
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