Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II

Children's Hospital Boston, Advancing Treatment and Services for Refugee Children and Adolescents

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2007 - 2011, and 2005 - 2001]
Description: 

The purpose of the project "Advancing Treatment and Services for Refugee Children and Adolescents: Boston Children's Hospital Center for Refugee Trauma and Resilience" is to provide national expertise in the area of Refugee Displacement and War Zone Trauma Refugee Health and Resettlement Agencies (Refugee Trauma). The proposed activities seek to achieve substantial progress in the development, training, dissemination, and evaluation of interventions that address refugee trauma. The project seeks to advance treatment and services for refugee trauma by pursuing the following goals:
1) To develop the infrastructure for successful dissemination of a known effective intervention for refugees (Trauma Systems Therapy for Refugees) 2) To further support the development, training, dissemination and evaluation of a web-based providers guide to assessing and responding to the needs of young refugees, the Refugee Services Toolkit, in key service system settings, 3) To develop and evaluate an innovative preventative intervention for refugee trauma called "Promoting Positive Social Identity" using a social media platform to promote positive social identity and resilience, 4) To provide leadership and support infrastructure within the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) that promotes the collection of high quality data for policy and advocacy related to refugee trauma, and 5) To provide leadership within our local community,  to the NCTSN and nationally on refugee trauma and the trauma-related  needs of children within the refugee health and refugee resettlement  service systems.  The project expects to train more than 150 service providers in refugee services, have more than 5000 providers access the RST and use it to improve services, and over the lifetime of the project to enhance the refugee expertise of providers both within and outside of the NCTSN.
 

Contact: 
Heidi Ellis
Phone: 
(617) 919-4679

University of Southern California, Adolescent Trauma Training Center

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The University of Southern California Adolescent Trauma Training Center (USC-ATTC) will train clinicians and disseminate information throughout the United States on the assessment and treatment of trauma effects—including substance abuse—in multitraumatized, socially marginalized adolescents who come in contact with mental health, substance abuse, child welfare, and juvenile justice systems. The intervention that USC-ATTC will disseminate is the recently developed, empirically validated Integrative Treatment of Complex Trauma for Adolescents (ITCT-A). To further increase ITCT-A's focus on youth who are involved in significant alcohol or drug abuse, the center will consult with experts and will augment this treatment package with two additional components: mindfulness training and intervention in substance abuse. These new ITCT-A components will be expanded into more comprehensive, stand-alone treatment guides—Mindfulness Training for Traumatized Adolescents and Treating Substance Abuse Issues in Traumatized Adolescents—that can be used as supplements to treatment packages or in approaches other than ITCT-A. Additional products of this project will be posted on the USC-ATTC and NCTSN websites, and will be distributed in face-to-face and Web-based workshops for NCTSN and non-NCTSN individuals and groups.

Contact: 
John Briere
Phone: 
(323) 226-5697
Email: 

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, FIRST Program

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The Families Increasing Resilience, Strength and Trust through positive relationships (FIRST) Program will leverage training expertise, program evaluation, and product development to further the NCTSN's mission to positively influence the lives of families impacted by trauma. The program will increase availability of two evidence-based interventions—Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and Sexual Behavior Problems: Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment (SBP-CBT)—delivered with high fidelity to traumatized families. Both PCIT (a SAMHSA-recognized intervention) and SBP-CBT (a comprehensive family-based intervention for children with inappropriate sexual behaviors) can be utilized to address child behavioral problems common among children affected by sexual and nonsexual trauma, and among families dealing with military deployment–related trauma. Implementation methods include innovative telehealth applications and Learning Collaborative strategies. The FIRST Program will expand treatments to military families experiencing deployment stressors and will enhance family resilience. The collaboration will contribute to the Network's understanding of the implementation process for family-based interventions including integrating new research findings from the program’s studies of telehealth-based implementation. Additionally, the program will provide support and leadership to Category III sites and other agencies seeking to expand their portfolio of trauma-informed services. Project deliverables will include: 1) PCIT and SBP-CBT Learning Collaborative models, 2) uniform training methods and materials, 3) telehealth protocols, and 4) development of a model of care for families of children with trauma exposure and secondary behavior management problems.

Contact: 
Beverly Funderburk
Phone: 
(405) 271-8858

University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Center for Trauma Recovery and Juvenile Justice

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The Center for Trauma Recovery and Juvenile Justice (CTRJJ) will bring together national leaders in the child traumatic stress field to develop and widely disseminate evidence-based trauma interventions and trauma-informed services for youth and families exposed to domestic and community violence who are involved in the court, juvenile justice, and law enforcement systems. Three evidence-based interventions will be disseminated to ten sites each and tested for sustainability in three parallel initiatives by model developers: Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy-Adolescents (TARGET-A), and Trauma and Grief Components Therapy-Adolescents (TGCT-A), which are the two most widely disseminated evidence-based trauma interventions for violence-exposed youth in juvenile justice; and Families OverComing Under Stress (FOCUS), an evidence-based trauma intervention for violence-exposed families. Additionally, two other Network-developed juvenile justice trauma-informed services curricula/tools—Think Trauma and Judges’ Benchcard—will be adapted and disseminated across court, juvenile justice, and law enforcement systems in ten sites. Network-developed fact sheets, webinars, and professional/public policy publications will be updated and extended to address key underserved, violence-exposed, justice-involved youth (including those who are involved in gangs, sex trafficking victims, sex offenders, and substance abusers) and youth of color. These initiatives will involve 50 Community Treatment and Services (CTS) Centers or non-Network sites with 300 service agencies in training 5,000 multidisciplinary justice-affiliated child service providers in at least 15 states.

Contact: 
Julian Ford
Phone: 
(860) 679-8778
Email: 

Lutheran Family Health Centers (LFHC), The School-Based Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Center

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The School-Based Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Center will be created by Lutheran Family Health Centers (LFHC), in collaboration with the New York City Department of Education in southwest Brooklyn, to further develop and validate trauma-informed treatments and services that will serve culturally diverse children and youth, and their families. The goals are to: 1) form a community coalition focused on building capacity to address child and family trauma, particularly within the context of larger child-serving systems including day care, preschools, schools, youth services, and child welfare; 2) build up community and stakeholder consensus and work collaboratively with TSA Centers and the NCCTS; 3) further culturally modify the TEMAS Narrative Therapy-Trauma (TNT-T); 4) develop an outreach component, which will include workshops to train parents, school and community agency personnel, and primary care providers; 5) train mental health staff and pediatric staff throughout the LFHC’s nine primary care centers and 15 school-based health centers; 6) identify, screen, and refer children and adolescents at high risk for traumatic stress; 7) train mental health staff at the Sunset Terrace Mental Health Center and Healthy Connections program; and 8) export training on the implementation of culturally competent, evidence-based TNT-T modalities.
 

Contact: 
Giuseppe Costantino
Phone: 
(718) 630-8919

Johns Hopkins University, Center for Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care: Pediatric Integrated Care Collaborative

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The Center for Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care: Pediatric Integrated Care Collaborative (PICC) will increase the quality of child trauma services by integrating behavioral and physical health services, targeting traumatic stress exposure and recovery, extending accessibility of services by integrating trauma-informed behavioral health services with primary care, and promoting a sustainable integration. The center will support three levels of collaborative activity: 1) a Breakthrough Series, which will generate and test innovations to bridge the gaps between existing practices for prevention/early intervention for toxic stress in young children and the application of these practices within primary care settings; 2) a Learning Collaborative, which will promote the dissemination and adoption of these innovations, and will develop a Pediatric Integrated Care Training and Resource Toolkit; and 3) an Integrated Care Collaborative Group (ICCG) of participants from SAMSHA-NCTSI–funded sites and Network Affiliates. Dissemination will also be facilitated through the center's six core sites, its links to the American Academy of Pediatrics, and its hosting of the National Network of Child Psychiatry Access Programs.
 

Contact: 
Lawrence Wissow
Phone: 
(410) 614-1243

Medical University of South Carolina, Program on Adolescent Traumatic Stress

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2003 - 2007]
Description: 

The Program on Adolescent Traumatic Stress (PATS) will further adapt, develop, evaluate, and disseminate evidence-based, culturally relevant, trauma-informed interventions and resources for traumatized adolescents; and will increase access to and build capacity nationally for the delivery of these interventions and services for this population. To achieve these goals the program will: 1) develop Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents (TF-CBT-A); 2) adapt and develop NCTSN products that support delivery of effective, trauma-informed services for adolescents involved in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems; and 3) evaluate, disseminate, and implement Risk Reduction through Family Therapy (RRFT)—an intervention designed to reduce substance use risk and trauma-related mental health problems among abused adolescents. The target population area is the Southeastern United States (which has high rates of youth victimization and a disproportionate number of youth involved in the child welfare system) to increase the capacity of and access to evidence-based, trauma-focused interventions. PATS will train 960 practitioners across six states through 12 additional Learning Collaboratives and Community-Based Learning Collaboratives.

Contact: 
Rochelle Hanson
Phone: 
(843) 792-2945

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress

Funding Period: 
[2012 -2016, 2007 - 2011, and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 

The Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress (CPTS) will continue to address health-related trauma in the lives of children and families. The center's mission is to reduce medical traumatic stress by promoting trauma-informed health care, by integrating practical evidence-based tools into pediatric medical care, and by ensuring that health care providers are knowledgeable and skilled in trauma-informed care for culturally diverse youth and their families. CPTS has developed and evaluated acute and brief family-focused interventions, which can be integrated within pediatric health care. The center’s four current goals are to: 1) engage and provide national expertise to health care providers and health care systems in improving outcomes for children and families with medical trauma; 2) adapt, disseminate, and provide training to mental health providers in trauma-informed assessments and interventions for children and families experiencing medical trauma; 3) ensure that children and families have access to evidence-based resources and interventions that address the impact of medical trauma; and 4) equip other child-serving systems with trauma-informed approaches to address injury, illness, and medical problems in children and families. Activities to achieve these goals include: promoting professional and public awareness of medical trauma via CPTS's active Web presence www.healthcaretoolbox.org (to reach 20,000 providers per year) and via CPTS’s partnership with national health provider organizations; supporting implementation of effective assessment and intervention for medical trauma in more than 100 health care settings; delivering training on and tools for assessment and intervention with medical trauma to more than 9,000 health and mental health providers; and disseminating trauma-focused resources in English and Spanish to children and families experiencing medical trauma.

Contact: 
Anne Kazak
Phone: 
(215) 590-2220

Allegheny General Hospital-Singer Research Institute, Center for Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2009 - 2012, 2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 

The Center for Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents will provide national expertise in Clinical Interventions for Traumatic Stress Reactions and Traumatic Grief. The center—which developed Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT)—will adapt both interventions for foster children with severe behavioral traumatic stress reactions, will develop a culturally adapted AF-CBT implementation manual, and will provide culturally adapted TF-CBT and AF-CBT training and consultation to therapists who treat military children. In addition, the center will: 1) address behavioral health disparities for children in foster care, LGBTQ youth, and military children with traumatic stress reactions or traumatic grief; 2) collaborate with Persad Center (the nation's second-oldest LGBTQ provider organization) to develop toolkits for child and adolescent mental health providers; 3) adapt TF-CBT treatment materials; 4) provide LGBTQ-competent TF-CBT training to therapists; and 5) develop a Clinical Interventions for Traumatic Stress and Traumatic Grief Partnership composed of national experts, highly experienced service providers, and consumers. This group will create and evaluate strategies of national impact to establish a sustainable workforce of therapists who can provide affordable, high-quality TF-CBT and AF-CBT for children across the United States.

Contact: 
Judith Cohen
Phone: 
(412) 330-4321

University of Missouri, Terrorism and Disaster Center

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 
The Terrorism and Disaster Center (TDC) will work to enhance mental health preparedness, recovery, and resilience in children, families, and communities affected by disaster. Along with national expertise, the TDC will provide resources for intervention, training, consultation, and technical assistance related to disasters and terrorism. Goals include: 1) providing national disaster mental health leadership, 2) increasing disaster mental health public awareness, 3) developing and implementing disaster mental health interventions, 4) creating disaster mental health training protocols and resources, 5) partnering with service providers, and 6) collaborating with NCTSN partners on disaster issues. TDC will develop, implement, and evaluate four disaster mental health interventions: the Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) for children, the Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART), the Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit for Youth (CART-Youth), and the Disaster and Media Intervention (DMI) for youth.
Contact: 
Brian Houston
Phone: 
(573) 882-3327
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