Protective Factors: Enhancing Resilience in Young Children and Families

The effects of traumatic experiences on young children are sobering, but not all children are affected in the same way, nor to the same degree. Children and families possess competencies, psychological resources, and resilience—often even in the face of significant trauma&1#151;that can protect them against long-term harm.

Children and families possess competencies,

psychological resources, and resilience—often even in

the face of significant  trauma—that can protect them

against long-term harm.

How Communities Can Help

Communities can do much to mobilize on behalf of children, and the larger society can make it a priority to make sure basic services are provided to children to help keep them safe.

How Parents/Caregivers Can Help
Research on resilience in children demonstrates that an essential protective factor for children is the reliable presence of a positive, caring, and protective parent/caregiver, who can help shield their children against adverse experiences. They can be a consistent resource for their children, encouraging them to talk about the experiences. And they can provide reassurance to their children that the adults in their life are working to keep them safe.