Bullying Prevention Awareness Month (October 2016)

10/2016

In support of Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) is providing resources for families, teens, educators, clinicians, mental health professionals, and law enforcement personnel on how to recognize, deal with, and prevent bullying. We recognize that bullying can be a form of traumatic stress that can result in significant harm to a youth’s social, emotional, and physical well-being and can affect how they function at school, at home, and in the community.

Bullying can occur in multiple ways.  Bullying can be verbal, physical, through social exclusion, and via the Internet. Unlike mutual teasing or fighting, bullying occurs when one person or a group of people is perceived as being more powerful than another and takes advantage of that power through repeated physical assaults, threats of harm, intimidation, or by purposefully excluding a person from a valued social group. This can take place in person, through intermediaries, and via technology (through texting, instant messaging, social network sites). Being bullied can severely affect the person’s self-image, social interactions, and school performance and can lead to mental health problems such as depression, anxiety, and substance use, and even suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Those students who bully other students are at increased risk for committing crimes, abusing alcohol and drugs, getting into fights, and dropping out of school, and as adults can be at risk for continuing to perpetrate violence and having a criminal conviction. They themselves may also be victims of traumatic stress. In addition, youth who are exposed to bullying but not directly involved, otherwise known as bystanders, can nonetheless be affected by witnessing bullying activity. Bystanders may feel guilty about their own inaction, may feel unsafe at school, and can also be at increased risk for depression, anxiety, drug abuse, and absenteeism from school.

The following resources provide information regarding bullying and bullying prevention for families and their communities.

Page Contents

Featured NCTSN Resources

NCTSN Schools and Trauma Speaker Series: Sticks and Stones Will Break My Bones, (and) Words CAN Hurt Me 
Offered through NCTSN’s Learning Center for Child and Adolescent Trauma. Uses the prevalence and impact of trauma as a lens through which to deepen participants' understanding of bullying. Applicable for school mental health professionals, school staff, and other interested individuals, the program considers the impact of bullying on the targeted child as well as on the bully, and addresses the response at the school site.

NCTSN Schools and Trauma Speaker Series: Understanding the Intersection Between Cyberbullying and Trauma 
This webinar is exclusively focused on understanding the intersection between cyberbullying and trauma.

Safe Spaces. Safe Places: Creating Welcoming and Inclusive Environments for Traumatized LGBTQ Youth (2015) (Video)
The NCTSN Child Sexual Abuse committee is pleased to announce the launch of a new video which highlights the effect of trauma on LGBTQ youth; how bias impedes optimal care, and practical steps for creating safe and welcoming environments for traumatized LGBTQ youth. The video features five LGBTQ youth describing how trauma and bias have affected their ability to feel safe when seeking services. National Child Traumatic Stress Net-work (NCTSN) presenters discuss specific steps that professionals and organizations can take to create safer and more welcoming environments for traumatized LGBTQ youth. 

Staying Safe While Staying Connected: Facts and Tips for Teens (2010) (PDF)
Addresses risks that come with continually staying connected via cell phones and computers through texting, tweeting, IMing, e-mailing, blogging, and posting.

Staying Safe While Staying Connected: Tips for Caregivers (2016) (PDF)
The factsheet covers “sexting” and the social and legal ramifications; the danger that apps can present; ways youth can protect their identity and personal information; recommendations about parental monitoring; and ways to keep communication open and support your teen if s/he is being cyberbullied.

 

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For Families

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration    
ADL fights anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry, defends democratic ideals and protects civil rights for all.

  • KnowBullying
    A free smartphone app that provides parents, caretakers, educators, and others information and support to address youth bullying. The KnowBullying mobile app, developed in collaboration with the federal partnership StopBullying.gov, is available for iPhone and Android users

StopBullying.gov
A website for parents, children, and educators that offers strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

Anti-Defamation League 
ADL fights anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry, defends democratic ideals and protects civil rights for all.

Embrace Civility
A program of Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use, promotes approaches that will best ensure young people become 'cyber savvy' and addresses youth risk in a positive and restorative manner.

The Cyberbullying Research Center
A clearinghouse for “up-to-date information about the nature, extent, causes, and consequences of cyberbullying among adolescents . . . [and on] the ways adolescents use and misuse technology. Geared to parents, educators, law enforcement officers, counselors, and others who work with youth.  Includes facts, figures, and detailed stories from those who have been directly impacted by online aggression; and numerous resources for preventing and responding to cyberbullying incidents.

PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential.
  • National Bullying Prevention Center
    A website that provides basic facts about bullying and treatments; videos, first-person stories, and information on how to talk to your kids about bullying. Includes products and links to other related resources and websites.

Safe in YourSpace
This website provides information on cyberspace safety and encourages children, parents and teachers to talk with one another about how to stay safe online. Includes information covering various areas including cyberbullying, financial scams, and sexual victimization.

Families of Children with Disabilities
AbilityPath.org is an online hub and special needs community for parents and professionals to learn, connect and live a more balanced life - through all phases of a child's growth and development. AbilityPath.org's mission is to build a community that brings together professionals and parents of children with special needs.

U.S. Department of Education

 

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For Teens and Tweens

StopBullying.gov
A website for parents, children, and educators that offers strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

  • Teens
    Webpage for teens provides information on what to do when being bullied, how to help someone who is being bullied, and how to become involved in bullying prevention.

STOP Cyberbullying
An interactive website offering resources to help prevent cyberbullying, encouraging everyone to “be part of the solution.” The materials are divided into   six sections: children (aged 7–10), preteens (aged 11–13), teens (aged 14–17), parents/caregivers, educators, and law enforcement personnel. Topics include 1) definition of cyberbullying, 2) how it works (types of cyberbullying), 3) why kids cyberbully, 4) preventing cyberbullying, 5) taking action, and 6) law enforcement. Users can download most of the materials by clicking on icons (Microsoft Word or PDF) on the top of the pages, especially helpful for easy creation of handouts and information packs for teaching and research.

The Trevor Project
A national organization that provides “crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth. . . . The Trevor Lifeline is the only nationwide, around-the-clock crisis and suicide prevention lifeline for LGBTQ youth . . . a free and confidential service that offers hope and someone to talk to, 24/7. Each year, tens of thousands of calls are fielded from young people across the country.” The website includes a directory of local services, tips for helping LGBTQ youth, workshops, resources for educators and parents, a live chatline with trained volunteers, and much more.

GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network)
A national education organization whose mission is centered on creating safe spaces in schools for K–12 students. They seek to “develop school climates where difference is valued for the positive contribution it makes in creating a more vibrant and diverse community.” The website and resources are focused on the acceptance of all people regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, or occupation. Includes information on their research and policymaking, plus tools and tips.

Anti-Defamation League 
ADL fights anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry, defends democratic ideals and protects civil rights for all.

PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential.
  • Teens Against Bullying
    An interactive site where teens can learn about preventing and responding to bullying—in cyberspace, via texting, and at school. Includes resources for kids and parents, and information on Facebook safety.
  • Middle and High School Students – Bullying 101: Guide for Middle and High School Students
    A visual, age appropriate 14-page guide with easy to understand information. The guide provides the basics for talking with students about what bullying is and isn’t, the roles of students, and tips on what students can do to address bullying situations.

NetSmartz® Workshop
An interactive, educational program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) that provides age-appropriate resources to help teach children how to be safer on- and offline through education, engagement, and empowerment. Designed for children ages 5-17, parents and guardians, educators, and law enforcement. Includes videos, games, activity cards, and presentations.

  • NetSmartz Student Project Kit
    The NetSmartz Student Project Kit helps students in grades 6-12 teach their peers and younger students about topics like cyberbullying, online privacy, and digital ethics

 

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For Educators

Centers for Disease Control Violence Prevention

Committee for Children
Works globally to prevent bullying, violence, and child abuse. The website offers programs, training (including free webinars), classroom activities, videos, resources for funding, an online store, and more.

GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network)
A national education organization whose mission is centered on creating safe spaces in schools for K–12 students. They seek to “develop school climates where difference is valued for the positive contribution it makes in creating a more vibrant and diverse community.” The website and resources are focused on the acceptance of all people regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, or occupation. Includes information on their research and policymaking, plus tools and tips.

The Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life helps generate, share and apply the research foundation for youth, family, and community social development.
  • Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
    A schoolwide program (for elementary, middle, and junior high schools) designed to reduce and prevent bullying problems, and to improve peer relations among schoolchildren. Offers training for school staff and for National Olweus trainers.
The National Center for School Engagement (NCSE), collaborates with school districts, law enforcement agencies, courts, and state and federal agencies to support youth and their families to be engaged at school.
  • Bully-Proofing Your School
    A program “for handling bully/victim problems through the creation of a ‘caring majority’ of students who take the lead in establishing and maintaining a safe and caring school community.” Improves school climate, addresses bystander and bullying behavior, teaches protective skills, and much more. Workshops are targeted to early childhood, elementary, middle, and high school personnel.

Safe in YourSpace
This website provides information on cyberspace safety and encourages children, parents and teachers to talk with one another about how to stay safe online. Includes information covering various areas including cyberbullying, financial scams, and sexual victimization.

StopBullying.gov
A website for parents, children, and educators providing strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

U.S. Department of Education

  • New Guidance on Responding to Bullying of Students with Disabilities (2014) (PDF)
    This guidance builds on anti-bullying guidance the U.S. Department of Education has issued in recent years concerning schools' legal obligations to address bullying, including ensuring that students with disabilities who are bullied continue to receive a free appropriate public education.

U.S Department of Justice

  • Bullying in Schools: An Overview (2011) (PDF)
    The bulletin provides an overview of the OJJDP-funded studies, between bullying in schools, school attendance and engagement, and academic achievement. A summary of the researchers’ findings, and recommendations for policy and practice is provided.
  • School-Based Programs to Reduce Bullying and Victimization (2009) (PDF)
    A research report presents presenting a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of programs designed to reduce school bullying perpetration and victimization. 

 

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For Clinicians and Mental Health Professionals

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

StopBullying.gov
A website for parents, children, and educators providing strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

 

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For Law Enforcement Personnel

The International Association of Chiefs of Police

  • Developing an Anti-Bullying Program: Increasing Safety, Reducing Violence (2006) (PDF)
    Part of a series of briefs in Juvenile Justice: Law Enforcement Training and Technical Assistance designed to help law enforcement leaders develop a proactive youth bullying–prevention program. Includes examples of programs that have significantly reduced bullying in schools, effective roles law enforcement personnel can play in bullying prevention, and links to many other related resources.

StopBullying.gov
A website for parents, children, and educators providing strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) is the component of the U.S. Department of Justice responsible for advancing the practice of community policing by the nation's state, local, territorial, and tribal law enforcement agencies through information and grant resources.
  • Bullying in Schools (2002) (PDF)
    Part of the Problem-Oriented Guides for Police Series. Describes bullying and its effects; outlines effective prevention and intervention strategies; offers techniques for speaking about bullying with school officials, victims, and offenders; includes resources.

 

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For Policy Makers

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are the nation's pre-eminent source of high-quality, objective advice on science, engineering, and health matters.
  • Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy, and Practice (2016) (PDF)
    The report evaluates the state of the science on biological and psychosocial consequences of bullying as well as the context, scope, and impact of the problem. The report also outlines next steps in prevention for policymakers, parents, educators, healthcare providers, and others concerned with the care of children.

 

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